Category

Journalism

Biography, History, Journalism, Non Fiction

Dec 07: The Pirate’s Wife with Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos

The Remarkable True Story of Sarah Kidd

Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos’ fascination with pirates focuses on the women behind those pirates. In The Pirate’s Wife, Daphne shares insight into the life of Sarah Kidd, and what it meant to be married to the infamous Captain William Kidd.

We take a peek into piracy and privateering in colonial America and discuss how the once respectable Kidd became a pirate; and why pirates were originally welcomed.  Daphne also reveals who Sarah was, her role, what drove her, and the big question we all want to know: Where is the treasure?

About Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos

Dr. Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos is a historian, journalist, and author who’s spent the past 15 years, researching pirates, their lives, and their wives.  The Pirate’s Wife – The Remarkable True Story of Sarah Kidd is Daphne’s second book (narrative nonfiction). Her writing on history, business, science, health, fitness, education, museums, parenting, philanthropy, and lifestyles has appeared in many major outlets, including The New York Times, the Washington Post, and Southern Living.

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Journalism, Memoir, Non Fiction

Sep 21: Rebel with a Clause – Ellen Jovin

Tales and Tips from a Roving Grammarian

Ellen Jovin‘s journey of almost 30,000 miles around America began outside her Manhattan apartment, with a folding table, and a sign saying GRAMMAR TABLE. From lawyers , couples, and families, to  writers, students, and rappers, passers-by had questions for Ellen — and she had answers.

But how did this take Ellen to 49 cities and towns, by five modes of transport? We discuss why people stopped by the Grammar Table, how that led to the  documentary film and Ellen’s book. And why this isn’t just about words, language, and grammar, but connection, community and — yes — sometimes just wanting to be right.

About Ellen Jovin

Ellen Jovin is the author of four books on language, and a cofounder of Syntaxis, a communication skills training consultancy. She has a B.A. in German studies, an M.A. in comparative literature …  and studied 25 languages just for fun. Her latest book is Rebel with a Clause: Tales and Tips from a Roving Grammarian.

 

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Creativity, Journalism, Non Fiction, Science

AUG 10: Matt Richtel’s Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul

Harness Your Creativity Through Inspiration

Few things in a creator’s life cause more frustration than staring at an empty page or blank canvas in search of that spark of inspiration.  Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Matt Richtel weaves scientific evidence with insight from great creators and his own personal experiences to help you discover how to optimize your creative potential.

“Creative people actually physically see more of the world,” says Richtel.  We talk about The Muse and Hope.  How impact and openness are vital components of creativity.  Why intelligence doesn’t always factor into creativity.  How anyone can become more creative. And more delicious insight from  Inspired: Understanding Creativity, A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul.

About Matt Richtel

Narrative storyteller and New York Times Science reporter Matt Richtel was awarded the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for a series on distracted driving. He’s authored three narrative nonfiction books, several novels, and a daily comic strip. His latest book is Inspired: Understanding Creativity, A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul.

Catch our previous podcast with Matt Richtel right here A Deadly Wandering.

 

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Journalism, Memoir, Non Fiction, Travel & Adventure

Jul 13: A Hard Place to Leave: Stories from a Restless Life with Marcia DeSanctis

Travel journalist of the year reveals the push-pull tension between home and away

What did travel writers do when their wanderings were halted during COVID lockdown? Marcia DeSanctis sorted through a decade’s body of work to compile her new book  A Hard Place to Leave: Stories from a restless life.

We discuss some of Marcia’s adventures and insights into being a travel writer. Why the desert is her sweet spot. How she balances her introverted self with writing open honest personal stories – including the search for her way back after falling in love with another man. And, how Marcia finds stories that resonate while traveling the globe.

About Marcia DeSanctis

Marcia DeSanctis is a Contributing Writer at Travel + Leisure, and writes essays and stories for Vogue, Town & Country, Departures, BBC Travel, and many other publications. She received the 2021 Grand Solas Award for Travel Story of the Year, and has received 5 Lowell Thomas Awards for excellence in travel journalism, including one for Travel Journalist of the Year. She’s the New York Times bestselling author of 100 Places in France every Woman Should Go … and the book we talk about today, A Hard Place to Leave Place to Leave: Stories from a restless life. 

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Health & Wellness, Journalism, Non Fiction, Psychology, Science, Self-help

JUL 06: Caroline Williams with MOVE

How the Science of Body Movement Can Set Your Mind Free

If you hate working out, loathe gong to the gym, listen up!  New science shows how even simple movement can boost your mental health.

Journalist Caroline Williams interviews Nobel prize winning scientists, yoginis, athletes, and health experts and learned that while going to the gym is great, it may not be the best solution for you.

We share how stretching lifts the draining effects of an overactive immune system. What dance can do for your emotional literacy. How core strength can help control stress and anxiety. And why emotional resilience is strengthened by physical strength.

About Caroline Williams

Veteran science journalist Caroline Williams says “I like talking almost as much as I like writing”. She has produced radio programs and reports for the BBC, across Science, Natural History, and Children’s Radio. Caroline writes regularly for New Scientist magazine, and her work’s been featured in the Boston Globe, BBC Earth, and the Guardian. She was co-presenter of the New Scientist podcast. Move! How the Science of Body Movement Can Set Your Mind Free is Caroline’s second book.

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Creativity, Journalism, Non Fiction, Science

Jun 15: Inspired–Understanding Creativity with Matt Richtel

A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul

How do we define creativity? How does it work? Where does inspiration spark? How can we optimize our own creative potential? And what do great creators have to share with us?

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Matt Richtel takes a deep dive into the new science behind creativity and creative minds, and blends it with insight from great creators, and stories of his own. We talk about The Muse and Hope. Why intelligence doesn’t always factor into creativity.  How anyone can become more creative. And more delicious insight from  Inspired: Understanding Creativity, A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul.

About Matt Richtel

An American writer, narrative storyteller, and New York Times Science reporter Matt Richtel was awarded the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for a series on distracted driving. He’s the author of three narrative nonfiction books, several novels, and a daily comic strip. His latest book is Inspired: Understanding Creativity, A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul.

Catch our previous podcast with Matt Richtel right here A Deadly Wandering.

 

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Environment, Journalism, Nature, Non Fiction

May 25: Greenpeace Captain on the Health of the Bering Sea & Why Fish Farming is No Solution

Vicki St. Clair onboard Greenpeace's the Rainbow Warrior, Seattle.

Onboard the Rainbow Warrior, Greenpeace, Vicki St. Clair

Onboard the Rainbow Warrior

Almost 9 years ago, Vicki took a field trip to meet with Captain Joel Stewart and Senior Campaigns Manager Jackie Dragon onboard Greenpeace’s Rainbow Warrior.

So, why are we sharing this again in 2022? Because despite best efforts, the Bering Sea is still in a precarious position. Because if we understand the science, we can clearly understand where we need to course-correct. And because these people, on board the Rainbow Warrior, are not only experts in their field, they really care about their work and the legacy we’re leaving for your children.

Vicki’s brother was visiting from England and tagged along as photographer. Both said touring the ship and meeting the crew was an awesome experience … from chef to communications specialist, scientist, and Captain “Rarely” said Vicki, “have I met people so genuinely invested in the work they do … ”

About the Crew

Captain Stewart shares why marine preserves and the health of the Bering Sea is so important to our ecology. He discusses why fish farming is not a good solution for ecosystems or feeding humans — and why that won’t even matter unless we get climate change and CO2 under control.

Scientist and campaigns manager, Jackie Dragon, shares details of a new species, more on the science of the Bering Sea, and why it’s critical to the survival of Native Alaskan communities.

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Journalism, Non Fiction, Social Issues

Apr 27: Why We Fall For Hype with Gabrielle Bluestone

How Con Artists, Grifters and Scammers are Taking Over the Internet – & Why We’re Following

Gabrielle Bluestone shares her insights into why scammers do what they do, and why – despite overwhelming evidence calling them out – we blindly believe what we’re told without researching the source.  She says we are at the natural end of a society primed to trust their own emotions over objective, verifiable facts.” 

From celebrities to politicians, to the little-known, we discuss why we get sucked into their spiel. Where social media and influencers factor in. The rise of cancel culture, where seemingly harmless messaging and soundbites create images that can make or break reputations and campaigns. Why Fyre was the greatest festival that never happened. Where greed plays a role. And why you shouldn’t trust cosmetic surgery photos because even they are often digitally altered.

About Gabrielle Bluestone

A journalist and licensed attorney from New York, Gabrielle Bluestone’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, New York Observer, Sunday Times Magazine, and more. She’s the Emmy-nominated producer of Netflix’s  documentary Fyre. And the associate producer of Different Flowers, winner of the 2017 Kansas City FilmFest Festival Prize.

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Journalism, Non Fiction

APR 06: Author Michelle Black Exposes Military Cover Up in Sacrifice

A Gold Star Widow’s Fight for the Truth

Michelle Black went from wife and mom to investigative journalist when her Green Beret husband Bryan Black was ambushed and killed in Niger. She was met with a flood of military disinformation, where they blamed and shamed Black and his team for going rogue. The media blindly repeated the military’s version of the ambush, and that ignited widow Michelle Black‘s search for the truth — no matter what.

We discuss the Black’s life before the military, before the fatal mission. How leadership ignored the advice to abort, and the many challenges Michelle faced  interviewing survivors to get to the heart of the truth. But she never gave up trying to restore Bryan’s reputation, and eventually exposed the military cover up that left her children fatherless.

About Michelle Black

Michelle Black is mom to two boys, a Gold Star widow, and author. She has a degree in environmental sciences and horticulture. She’s been published in the New York Times, The Daily Beast, and Task & Purpose. Sacrifice: A Gold Star Widow’s Fight for the Truth is her debut book.

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Journalism, Non Fiction

Feb 16: Stephen Kurczy’s quest to understand The Quiet Zone

Unpacking the Mysteries of a Town Suspended in Silence

Imagine a place completely disconnected from everyday tech. Where you’re not supposed to use cell phones; where the peaceful solitude of forest hikes is never invaded by ringtones or one-way conversations. Where getting lost means unfolding a map because GPS won’t work?

When Stephen Kurczy embarked on his three-year journey to understand The Quiet Zone, he figured a community based in quiet would be idyllic. He hadn’t owned a cell phone for 10 years, so he’d fit right in … right?

Among the hippies, mountain men, and electrosensitives, he also uncovered a darker side of this Appalachian region — unsolved murders, Nazis, a government spy facility. Can you say conspiracy theories?

About Stephen Kurczy

From the Cambodia’s muddy jungles to the dense rain forests of Brazil, award-winning investigative journalist Stephen Kurczy, reported stories from around the globe for The Christian Science Monitor, The Economist, The New York Times, and other publications. The Quiet Zone is Stephen Kurczy’s debut nonfiction book.

 

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