Tag

Exploration

Fiction

Jul 04: 1] The Girl From The Savoy 2] Jungle of Stone: The Lost Civilization of the Maya

Conversations Live regular and NY Times and USA Today bestseller Hazel Gaynor is back to discuss her latest historical fiction novel, The Girl From the Savoy. Hazel takes us back to the roaring 20’s with the tale of a humble chambermaid who gets the opportunity to face the ultimate decision… choosing between everything she knows, and everything she dreams of.

Jungle of Stone: The Extraordinary Journey That Uncovered the Lost Civilization of the Maya is journalist William Carlsen’s definitive account of how two intrepid explorers changed the prevailing view of human history in the Western Hemisphere. It chronicles the daring journey of John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood’s to uncover, document, and contextualize for the world what would come to be known as the remains of the Maya civilization.

While you enjoy this encore presentation of Conversations Live with Vicki St. Clair, don’t forget that for exclusive updates throughout the rest of the week, you can like us on Facebook, and follow Vicki St. Clair on Twitter! Vicki returns live next Monday at noon on KKNW 1150AM or 94.9FM HD.

The Girl From the Savoy by returning guest Hazel Gaynor introduces Dolly Lane, a chambermaid at London’s grandest hotel, The Savoy, who dreams to live alongside the Bright Young Things who thrive on champagne, jazz, and rebellion. When she responds to an ad to become a ‘muse’ for a struggling songwriter, she finds herself thrust into London’s exhilarating theatre scene. At the precipice of the life she has and the one she longs for, she must make a difficult choice: between two men; between two classes; between everything she knows and everything she dreams of. The Girl From the Savoy is Hazel’s third novel in the growing genre of historical fiction, with her first two becoming USA Today and NY Times bestsellers.

When John Lloyd Stephens, the U.S. Charge d’affaires appointed by President Martin Van Buren, set out for Guatemala City in 1839, his official mission was to broker a trade agreement with the leaders of the recently formed United Provinces of Central America. But he and Frederick Catherwood, an English artist and architect, had a separate and more personal goal for the excursion – to explore the Central American jungle in search of hidden, unknown worlds. William Carlsen fleshes out a rollicking account of their expeditions, and their quest to make sense of their findings for the rest of the world in Jungle of Stone: The Extraordinary Journey That Uncovered the Lost Civilization of the Maya. William has been a journalist for thirty years, a finalist for the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting and a winner of numerous journalism awards.

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Environment, Inspirational, Personal Development

Jun 20: 1] Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging 2] The Battle for Virunga

Combining history, psychology and anthropology, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging by award-winning journalist Sebastian Junger focuses specifically on the problem American veterans and American society faces today — the breakdown of our communities and our “Tribe.”

National Geographic Explorer correspondent Justin Hall ventures into Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for a candid look at a region in conflict over the park’s valuable but endangered natural resources in The Battle for Virunga.

Enjoy Conversations Live with Vicki St. Clair every Monday at noon Pacific on KKNW 1150AM or 94.9FM HD. For exclusive updates throughout the rest of the week, like us on Facebook, and follow Vicki St. Clair on Twitter!

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging by award-winning journalist Sebastian Junger explores what we can learn from tribal societies about loyalty, belonging, and the eternal human quest for meaning. It explains the irony that—for many veterans as well as civilians—war feels better than peace, adversity can turn out to be a blessing, and disasters are sometimes remembered more fondly than weddings or tropical vacations. Perhaps most importantly, it explains why we are stronger when we come together, and how that can be achieved even in today’s divided world. Sebastian is a New York Times Bestselling author, award-winning journalist, a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and a special correspondent at ABC News. He has covered major international news stories around the world, and has received both a National Magazine Award and a Peabody Award.

In terms of natural resources, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is one of the wealthiest nations in the world. Yet, over 50 percent of the country’s population lives on less than $1.25 per day. For the 4 million desperately poor residents living in and around Virunga National Park, the park’s borders are an arbitrary distinction, and conservation is just another term for the rich and powerful taking the best for themselves. Armed militias also use the park and its vast resources as a means of power in an ongoing and bloody regional conflict. In The Battle for Virunga National Geographic Explorer correspondent Justin Hall ventures into Virunga to meet park director Emmanuelle de Merode and veteran park ranger Innocent Mburanumwe for a candid interview about the rebel groups and militias roaming the park’s jungles, the slaughter of the park’s protected species, the Western oil giants seeking to extract the park’s vast resources and the park rangers who have been murdered in the line of duty.

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Biography, Fiction

Jun 06: 1] The Girl From The Savoy 2] Jungle of Stone: The Lost Civilization of the Maya

Listen to PODCAST –

Conversations Live regular and NY Times and USA Today bestseller Hazel Gaynor is back to discuss her latest historical fiction novel, The Girl From the Savoy. Hazel takes us back to the roaring 20’s with the tale of a humble chambermaid who gets the opportunity to face the ultimate decision… choosing between everything she knows, and everything she dreams of.

Jungle of Stone: The Extraordinary Journey That Uncovered the Lost Civilization of the Maya is journalist William Carlsen’s definitive account of how two intrepid explorers changed the prevailing view of human history in the Western Hemisphere. It chronicles the daring journey of John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood’s to uncover, document, and contextualize for the world what would come to be known as the remains of the Maya civilization.

Enjoy Conversations Live with Vicki St. Clair every Monday at noon Pacific on KKNW 1150AM or 94.9FM HD. For exclusive updates throughout the rest of the week, like us on Facebook, and follow Vicki St. Clair on Twitter!

The Girl From the Savoy by returning guest Hazel Gaynor introduces Dolly Lane, a chambermaid at London’s grandest hotel, The Savoy, who dreams to live alongside the Bright Young Things who thrive on champagne, jazz, and rebellion. When she responds to an ad to become a ‘muse’ for a struggling songwriter, she finds herself thrust into London’s exhilarating theatre scene. At the precipice of the life she has and the one she longs for, she must make a difficult choice: between two men; between two classes; between everything she knows and everything she dreams of. The Girl From the Savoy is Hazel’s third novel in the growing genre of historical fiction, with her first two becoming USA Today and NY Times bestsellers.

When John Lloyd Stephens, the U.S. Charge d’affaires appointed by President Martin Van Buren, set out for Guatemala City in 1839, his official mission was to broker a trade agreement with the leaders of the recently formed United Provinces of Central America. But he and Frederick Catherwood, an English artist and architect, had a separate and more personal goal for the excursion – to explore the Central American jungle in search of hidden, unknown worlds. William Carlsen fleshes out a rollicking account of their expeditions, and their quest to make sense of their findings for the rest of the world in Jungle of Stone: The Extraordinary Journey That Uncovered the Lost Civilization of the Maya. William has been a journalist for thirty years, a finalist for the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting and a winner of numerous journalism awards.

 

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