Category

Social Issues

Health & Wellness, Memoir, Non Fiction, Social Issues

MAY 20: Jared Yates Sexton’s The Man They Wanted Me To Be, Lauren McDuffie’s Smoke Roots Mountain Harvest, & Jodi Helmer’s Tea Garden

Depression.  Lower life expectancy.  Misogyny.  Suicide.  These are just the worst of the societal consequences of toxic masculinity, failing both men and women.  The Man They Wanted Me to Be doubles as a memoir and cultural analysis, told from the point of view of Jared Yates Sexton, who was raised with strict expectations that are outdated in our current cultural climate.

Jared is a contributing political writer at Salon, and his political writing has appeared in The New York Times, The New Republic, and elsewhere. He has authored three collections of fiction and a crime novel, and is an associate professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University.

Next, capture the flavors and modern cooking techniques of Appalachia and the Blue Ridge Mountains in Smoke, Roots, Mountain, Harvest.  Author Lauren McDuffie joins us to share some tales from Appalachian country and her favorite recipes, including Drunken Short Ribs and Baked Pork Chops with Cran-Apple Moonshine compote.

Lauren admits she is not a chef, but a passionate and curious lover of food, and writes the award-wining food blog Harvest and Honey.

Later, Jodi Helmer has a love of tea that developed as a young child.  While her palate and tastes have changed, her passion for tea has remained.  In Growing Your Own Tea Garden, she shares tips for turning your garden (or windowsill) into a mini tea plantation..

Jodi’s writing has appeared in publications like SierraEntrepreneur, NPR, National Geographic TravelerAARP, and more, and she has authored six books.  She lives  on a small homestead in rural North Carolina where she grows flowers and vegetables, keeps bees and raises chickens, goats and one very spoiled donkey.

 

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Inspirational, Memoir, Non Fiction, Social Issues, Women's Issues

APR 22: Meredith May’s The Honey Bus & Laurie Halse Anderson’s SHOUT

Today’s show kicks off with a buzzworthy guest … literally.  Meredith May learned some of life’s most pivotal lessons about community, loyalty and survival from one of nature’s most fragile and important creatures.  Raised by her fourth generation beekeeper grandfather while her mother’s mental state slowly deteriorated, Meredith’s found everything she needed to know about family was buzzing right there in the hive.  Her new memoir is The Honey Bus: A Memoir of Courage and a Girl Saved by Bees.

Meredith spent sixteen years at the San Francisco Chronicle, where her narrative reporting won the PEN USA Literary Award for Journalism and was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize.  She is a fifth generation beekeeper.

Later, frustrated by how little has changed in the 20 years since first writing about sexual assault in her groundbreaking, award-winning novel Speak, Laurie Halse Anderson reveals her personal history as a survivor of sexual assault and her journey to healing in her new book SHOUT.  Today, she’ll discuss solutions to this ongoing problem, sharing key insights from among the thousands of women she has interviewed over the last two decades.

Laurie’s is a New York Times bestseller whose writing spans young readers, teens, and new adults.  In addition to combatting censorship, she regularly speaks about the need for diversity in publishing and is a member of RAINN’s National Leadership Council.

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Conservation, Environment, Lifestyle, Social Issues, Travel & Adventure, Women's Issues

MAR 18: Debra Gwartney’s I am a Stranger Here Myself & National Geographic’s 100 Dives of a Lifetime

Returning guest Debra Gwartney, like many women, struggles with the challenges presented when trying to find that authentic connection with where your roots are … or where you are trying to lay them down.  In I am a Stranger Here Myself, Debra weaves frontier history into a personal exploration of womanhood, place, and a sense of belonging.

Debra is a Pacific University Professor, journalist, and author who grew up in Idaho and now tries to find a sense of permanence on on the upper McKenzie River on the west slope of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon.  Listen to her original appearance on Conversations Live here.

National Geographic’s Carrie Miller was initially motivated to learn to dive by great white sharks … and her passion and discoveries have led her to raise awareness of the critical changes we need to make to ensure the future health of our oceans.  You’ll come away from National Geographic’s 100 Dives of a Lifetime knowing why she calls the ocean the heartbeat of our planet.

Carrie has been covering travel for National Geographic since 1998.  She is a two-time Lowell Thomas Award winner and acclaimed contributing editor at National Geographic Traveler magazine.

 

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Health & Wellness, Non Fiction, Personal Development, Self-help, Social Issues, Women's Issues

FEB 11: Linda Graham’s Resilience & Alexia Vernon’s Step Into Your Moxie

Do you stoically remain calm and together during a traumatic event?  Or are you more likely to fall apart?  Resilience: Powerful Practices for Bouncing Back from Disappointment, Difficulty, and even Disaster by Linda Graham, MFT, examines our brain’s built-in negativity bias, offering ways to improve your ability to withstand hardships and create positive change.

Linda is an experienced psychotherapist who integrates modern neuroscience, mindfulness practices, and relational psychology in her international trainings on resilience and well-being.  She is a past winner of the Books for a Better Life Award.

Recent headlines have proven that women still have a long way to go to overcome patriarchal prejudices. Forget payscale for a moment, and other more obvious gender inequalities. We’re talking about being taken seriously as a valued human being. We’re talking about being heard when we say NO. When we file complaints about abuse or harassment. When we claim the right to express our feelings.

If you have trouble speaking up for yourself, join us and Step Into Your Moxie.

Alexia Vernonbranded “Moxie Maven” by President Obama’s White House Office of Public Engagement, is a leadership coach for Fortune 500 companies and the United Nations. With a  graduate degree in women’s studies, she’s been featured on major networks and in publications such as Forbes Woman and Women’s Health.

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Essays, Health & Wellness, Memoir, Social Issues

JAN 21: Suicide Awareness & Prevention Special with A. W. Barnes, Dr. Eileen Kennedy-Moore, & Sigrid Reinert

Death by suicide leaves family members and loved ones with a million unanswered questions. Today we devote the entire hour to suicide awareness and prevention.

Eileen Kennedy-Moore, PhD, is an author and psychologist. As a trusted expert on parenting, child development, and mental health, Dr. Kennedy-Moore joins us to discuss Suicide in Children–What Every Parent Must Know.  If you have kids, this is a must!

We’ll also hear from Sigrid Reinert, suicide prevention specialist with the Washington State Department of Health Suicide Prevention Resource Center. She’ll share signs that indicate someone may be suicidal, red flags to act upon, and expert resources for those who need help.

And, since coping with the suicide of a loved one is arguably one of the hardest experiences we face, we’ll end the hour with one man’s painful journey following the death of his older brother, Mike.

Author A.W. Barnes and Mike were both gay and raised in a large, unaccepting, ultra-conservative Midwest family that shaped their identities … until Mike took his own life.

Seeking catharsis, A.W. wrote a collection of personal essays in The Dark Eclipse: Reflections on Suicide and Absence. Did he find the answers he was looking for? Did Mike’s death change his views on how they were raised? Has time and reflection helped A.W. come to terms with his loss?

A.W. Barnes has a Ph.D. in English Literature and an MFA in Creative Writing. His nonfiction  has appeared in numerous publications, and he’s the academic author of Post-Closet Masculinities in Early Modern England.

 

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Conservation, Environment, Journalism, Social Issues

DEC 10: Award-winning Filmmaker John de Graaf

John de Graaf is one of the good guys in our world, always right there with the next important, life-affirming idea,” says The Giraffe Project’s Ann Medlock.  Beginning in the late 70’s, John embarked on an award-winning documentary film career that continues to this day.

Today we’ll explore John’s extensive career as a filmmaker and activist, and why he does what he does. We’ll hear about his latest film, REDEFINING PROSPERTIY, and some of the activism he’s engaged in. We’ll discover how John chooses projects, and how he navigated his own prolific creative path while still making a difference in people’s lives.

“I’m an author, filmmaker, speaker, and activist with a mission to help create a happy, healthy, and sustainable quality of life for America,” reads John’s mission statement.

With over 40 documentaries and countless shorter films to his credit, he has received over 100 regional, national, and international awards for filmmaking.  15 of his films have been broadcast nationally in primetime on PBS, and he has taught filmmaking at the University of Washington, Evergreen State College, and Boston University’s Center for Digital Imaging Arts.

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Health & Wellness, Non Fiction, Personal Development, Self-help, Social Issues, Women's Issues

OCT 08: Linda Graham’s Resilience & Alexia Vernon’s Step Into Your Moxie

Do you stoically remain calm and together during a traumatic event?  Or are you more likely to fall apart?  Resilience: Powerful Practices for Bouncing Back from Disappointment, Difficulty, and even Disaster by Linda Graham, MFT, examines our brain’s built-in negativity bias, offering ways to improve your ability to withstand hardships and create positive change.

Linda is an experienced psychotherapist who integrates modern neuroscience, mindfulness practices, and relational psychology in her international trainings on resilience and well-being.  She is a past winner of the Books for a Better Life Award.

Recent headlines have proven that women still have a long way to go to overcome patriarchal prejudices. Forget payscale for a moment, and other more obvious gender inequalities. We’re talking about being taken seriously as a valued human being. We’re talking about being heard when we say NO. When we file complaints about abuse or harassment. When we claim the right to express our feelings.

If you have trouble speaking up for yourself, join us and Step Into Your Moxie.

Alexia Vernonbranded “Moxie Maven” by President Obama’s White House Office of Public Engagement, is a leadership coach for Fortune 500 companies and the United Nations. With a  graduate degree in women’s studies, she’s been featured on major networks and in publications such as Forbes Woman and Women’s Health.

 

 

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Fiction, Inspirational, Memoir, Social Issues, Women's Issues, Writers on Writing

SEP 24: Linda Kay Klein’s PURE and Joseph Olshan’s Black Diamond Falls

On the heels of the MeToo movement comes Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement that Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke FreeLinda Kay Klein shares how the system of mind-and-body shaming works, showing the connection between purity culture and rape culture, and the importance of facing your fears and standing up to sexual shaming.

Linda is the founder of Break Free Together, and has spent over a decade working at the cross section of faith, gender, and social change.

 Inspired by the actual disappearance of a student at Middlebury College and the vandalism of the nearby Robert Frost Homestead, Black Diamond Fall is an evocative portrait of love between a younger and older man.  Author Joseph Olshan joins us for part one of a two part conversation today to discuss this latest in his line of riveting mysteries.

Joseph is an award-winning author of 10 novels and is the editorial director of Delphinium Books.  He will be appearing at University Bookstore in Seattle on October 18 at 6pm.

 

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Fiction, Memoir, Social Issues, Writers on Writing

SEP 17: Ellen Keith’s The Dutch Wife & Sara Smarsh’s Heartland

Award-winning writer Ellen Keith joins us today to discuss how she found the inspiration for a great historical fiction novel in one of the worst moments of humanity’s history.  In The Dutch Wife, she chronicles a little known piece of World War II history, exposing the concentration camp brothels.

Ellen’s work has appeared in publications such as The New Quarterly and The Globe and Mail, and she has received the Anton Fiction Prize and the James Patrick Folinsbee Memorial Scholarship in Creative Writing.

Born a fifth-generation Kansas wheat farmer on her paternal side, and the daughter of generations of teen moms on her maternal side, Sara Smarsh was raised in a family of laborers trapped in a cycle of poverty.  In Heartland, she takes an uncompromising look at class, identity, and the perils of having less in a country known for its excess.

Sara has covered socioeconomic class, political, and public policy for numerous publications including Harpers.org, The Guardian, and NewYorker.com. She’s a recent Joan Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard and former professor of nonfiction writing.

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Conservation, Inspirational, Lifestyle, Social Issues

SEP 10: William Powers’ Dispatches from the Sweet Life & American Warrior Initiative with Sean Parnell

Wouldn’t it be great to rid yourself of bills, work, technology, all the trappings of our modern lifestyles? William Powers journeys from rural North Carolina, to Manhattan, to Bolivia, as he and his family pursue sustainable living in Dispatches from the Sweet Life: One Family, Five Acres, and a Community’s Quest to Reinvent the World.

William has spent two decades in development aid and conservation around the world.  His essays and commentaries on global issues have appeared in the New York Times and the International Herald Tribune.

Sean Parnell has witnessed firsthand the difficulty of reintegrating into society after returning from war, as his platoon has suffered three times as many men to post-war suicide than in combat.  His American Warrior Initiative aids returning veterans by providing them fully paid for service dogs.

Sean is a former U.S. Army airborne ranger who served in the legendary 10th Mountain Division for six years, retiring as a captain. He received two Bronze Stars (one for valor) and the Purple Heart.  Also an author, his latest novel is Man of War.

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