Category

Social Issues

Non Fiction, Social Issues, Women's Issues

AUG 26: Julie Suk with We The Women & Why the Equal Rights Amendment Matters

Julie Suk joins us to discuss stories from her new book WE THE WOMEN: The Unstoppable Mothers of the Equal Rights Amendment.

We explore why the ERA still hasn’t made it into the U.S. Constitution — and who’s blocking it.  What that means to women today, and what to do about it.  Julie also highlights some of the brilliant women suffragists who’ve kept pushing the ERA forward despite fierce opposition and subterfuge.

Julie C. Suk is a frequent media commentator on legal issues affecting women. She’s a professor of Sociology, Political Science, and Liberal Studies at the the Graduate Center of the City University of New York where she serves as Dean for Master’s Programs.

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Conservation, Environment, Non Fiction, Social Issues, Sustainability

JUL 22: Facing the Climate Emergency with Dr. Margaret Klein Salamon

“You can create transformative change only by facing the truth.”  So much of the battle to save the climate is psychological and Dr. Margaret Klein Salamon’s new book, Facing the Climate Emergency: How to Transform Yourself with Climate Truth, gives you the tools to face your negative emotions, accept your fears, and channel them into protecting humanity and the natural world.

So what is the Climate Truth we need to face? Simply put, Dr. Margaret Klein Salamon believes the scientific consensus that our current ecological crisis threatens every life on our planet.

Margaret Klein Salamon, PhD, is a clinical psychologist turned climate warrior and founder of The Climate Mobilization, which pioneered the internationally recognized Climate Emergency.

 

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Creativity, Fiction, Social Issues, Writers on Writing

JUL 15: A Dangerous Breed with Glen Erik Hamilton

Thriller author Glen Erik Hamilton returns to Conversations Live with the latest novel in his popular Van Shaw series, A Dangerous Breed.  We discuss a broad range of topics, including character development and how he keeps his recurring characters evolving from book to book.  We also dive into some of the research he did for the novel, and where he took creative license and why.

Glen also shares his perspective on artist rights and responsibilities as related to our current political climate and how artists can (or should) go about representing characters from other backgrounds or orientations.

Glen grew up aboard a sailboat in Seattle, Washington, playing and occasionally finding trouble around the islands, marinas, and commercial docks of the Pacific Northwest.  His books in the Van Shaw series have won numerous awards and received critical acclaim from Publishers WeeklyLibrary Journal, and more.

 

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Humor, Non Fiction, Social Issues

FEB 19: Steven Goldstein’s The Turn-On

In our world of 24/7 media, what draws you to certain public figures over others?  When celebrities step into your household through the screen or speaker, what are the essential ingredients that determine whether you gravitate to them or find them repulsive?  And why do some celebrities thrive after a scandal while others wither away in disgrace?  Spending much of his career working among public figures, Steven Goldstein invented a tangible way to measure likeability using eight critical traits.  His new book is The Turn-On: How the Powerful Make Us Like Them – From Washington to Wall Street to Hollywood.

Steven Goldstein is a civil rights leader who began his career as a television news producer, winning ten Emmys, before becoming a producer for Oprah Winfrey. He worked as a lawyer for the U.S. House Judiciary Committee, and as a communications director in the U.S. Senate, before becoming a strategist for leaders in politics, business, and entertainment.

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Conservation, Environment, Health & Wellness, Humor, Social Issues

DEC 18: Richard Louv’s Our Wild Calling

What would your life be like if you were as immersed in nature as you are in your electronic devices?  Today you will find out how connecting with animals can improve our spiritual, mental, and physical well-being.  You’ll learn why a coyote riding on public transportation could become the new norm, and how our children can learn ethical behavior from our dogs.  And find out how our guest compares raccoons to Silicone Valley and Seattle technophiles!

Richard Louv is a journalist and author of ten books, and co-founder and chair emeritus of the nonprofit Children & Nature Network.  In 2008, he was awarded the Audubon Medal, presented by the National Audubon Society. Prior recipients have included Rachel Carson, E. O. Wilson, Sir David Attenborough and President Jimmy Carter.  His new book is Our Wild Calling: How Connecting with Animals Can Transform our Lives — and Save Theirs.

 

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Health & Wellness, Social Issues, Travel & Adventure

DEC 04: Christina Adams’ Camel Crazy and a Boy with Autism

It’s often said a mother will go to the ends of the earth for the health and well being of her children.  Today we are joined by a mother of an autistic son whose mission really did take her across the globe – from Bedouin camps in the Middle East to Amish farms in Pennsylvania to villages in India.  Christina Adams shares how camel’s milk helped her son, as well as what studies show regarding how it may be able to help with other common health issues, and the sustainability of raising camels as an alternative to cow’s milk or soy.  Her new book is Camel Crazy: A Quest for Miracles in the Mysterious World of Camels.

Christina is an award-winning journalist and author who speaks on writing, culture, autism, and camels.  Her work has been featured by National Public Radio, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles TimesGlobal Advances in Health and Medicine, and more.

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Business, Career, Non Fiction, Social Issues, Women's Issues

NOV 27: Andrea Kramer’s It’s Not You, It’s the Workplace

Women have made great strides in establishing themselves in the workforce, so why do most workplaces remain male dominated environments?  Andrea Kramer joins us today to discuss ways we can close that gap, from avoiding applying double standards to female colleagues to the consequences resulting from men bragging and self-promoting while women downplay their achievements.  You’ll also find out that millenials might not be quite as different as you thought, and why perfectionsim is overrated.  Andrea’s new book, co-authored with her husband, Alton Harris, is It’s Not You, It’s the Workplace: Women’s Conflict at Work and the Bias that Built It.

For decades, attorneys Andrea and Alton have confronted gender bias in the workplace through speaking, workshops, articles, blog posts, podcasts, one-on-one counselling, and engagements with national and international business and professional organizations. They have appeared in The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and many other publications.

 

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Fiction, Social Issues, Women's Issues, Writers on Writing

NOV 06: Eileen Pollack’s The Professor of Immortality

Inspired by the true story of the Unabomber, Eileen Pollack’s fictional Technobomber is an incel archetype.  His anger at the ways in which technology is destroying the environment and ruining the quality of human existence couples with a deep loneliness and inner rage at being unable to find love, driving him over the edge.  The Professor of Immortality raises concerns about the people designing future technology and how it will affect our everyday lives.

Eileen is a writer whose novel Breaking and Entering, about the deep divisions between blue and red America, was named a 2012 New York Times Editor’s Choice selection. She also is the author of five novels, two collections of short stories.  Her work has appeared in Best American Short Stories, Pushcart Prizes, and Best American Essays.

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Non Fiction, Social Issues

OCT 30: Alexandra Horowitz’s Our Dogs, Ourselves

“Who we are with dogs is who we are as people,” says Alexandra Horowitz, head of the Dog Cognition Lab at Barnard College and author of Our Dogs Ourselves: The Story of a Singular Bond.  Alexandra returns to Conversations Live to discuss how the relationship between us and our dogs affects both species.  Find out why breeding can cause a myriad of problems, and why you might want to think twice about spaying/neutering.

Alexandra is the author of three previous books, Being a Dog,  On Looking; and Inside of a Dog.. She is a professor at Barnard College, Columbia University, where she teaches seminars in canine cognition, creative nonfiction writing, and audio storytelling.  Enjoy her previous appearance on Conversations Live here.

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Health & Wellness, Non Fiction, Personal Development, Social Issues

OCT 23: Clive Wynne’s Dog is Love

Does your dog love you or see you as a supplier of food?  Is he/she even capable of love?  A long-standing debate between science and dog lovers has centered around these questions, and now we have an answer from a scientist … in favor of dog lovers.  Drawing on cutting edge studies from labs around the world, canine behaviorist Clive Wynne uses genetic codes, meticulously studied brain states, and a lifetime of behavioral observation to conclude that a dogs capacity for love … not their submissiveness or intelligence … lies at the heart of our relationships with our furry friends.

Today you’ll learn how to help your dog lead a more satisfying and fulfilling life through bridging affection, whether it’s with a new puppy or an older dog coming into your life for it’s twilight years.  Clive’s book is Dog is Love: Why and How Your Dog Loves You.

Clive Wynne, Ph.D. is the founding director of the Canine Science Collaboratory at Arizona State University. He is widely published and has appeared on National Geographic Explorer, PBS, and the BBC.

 

 

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